Repairing Plaster Walls

Plastering is considered one of the oldest trades in the building profession. Plastering is, in a nutshell, putting plaster on walls and ceilings, using materials that form both a sound- and fire-proof service. Plastering also consists of using plaster veneer over drywall to make a textured finish, and installing prefabricated insulation systems and cast ornaments. There are several types of plastering; notable types include dry lining, wherein plasterer near me a lining is applied to an interior wall that does not need to be plastered; and fibrous, wherein the material used will be fibrous, composed of plaster laid upon the back of canvas that have been stretched on work. A good plasterer will know the difference in types, and when the most suitable time is to use them.

Plastering is, in some ways, a job that holds great responsibility. Although the tasks may seem minor to some people, a plasterer’s work can be the difference between a strong, steady wall and a wall with plenty of cracks and holes in it. Obviously, this can lead to weaker foundations for a home and, consequently, major structural risk and damage. This explains why plasterers are in high demand, and why they are often the recipients of high praise once a job is completed.

Training to be a Plasterer
To take the first step on the ladder to becoming a plasterer, you will require training, in the form of an apprenticeship scheme. Funding for apprenticeships is available for 16-24 year olds, mainly, although it is also available for some over 25’s, depending on their circumstances. In order to be eligible for an apprenticeship, you will need some GCSE grades in such subjects as Mathematics, English Literature and Design Technology. Equivalent qualifications such as the Edexcel Introductory Certificate or a Diploma in Construction would also be accepted.

During your training, you will be aiming to achieve a number of qualifications.
These include: the City & Guilds Basic Skills in Construction Certificate; the Intermediate/Advanced Award; and the Entry Level Certificate in Preparation for Employment. From there, you should look to gain some work experience, which will provide you with on-the-job training. However, to establish a successful career, it is recommended at this point that you try to earn an NVQ in Plastering. These are available at a number of training centres around the UK.

NVQ Assessment
NVQ’s are work based assessments, meaning that you have to be working in order for an assessor to visit you. Despite the difficulties you may face in finding work, the City & Guilds Certificate that you earned during your training should help you to find employment eventually. You can then explain to your employer that you want to be assessed for an NVQ.

You will firstly have an interview with your assessor, during which an action plan will be arranged. NVQ’s are achieved through on-the-job assessment, during which an assessor will arrange to visit you at your workplace, and will observe and question you regarding your job.

Your assessor will sign off individual units when candidates are ready, testing your knowledge, understanding and work performance as you demonstrate your competence in the workplace. You will receive advice on their observations as well as any other guidance.

The assessor will then tell you if you have passed the assessment as competent for each unit. Once you have passed each unit, you will have earned the whole NVQ. There is also an equivalent qualification available in Scotland, known as the SVQ. The structure for the SVQ course is very similar to that of the NVQ.